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January 29, 2008

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It's great that you feel all this is building your confidence in filipino food. Maybe your next pancit could be something a bit harder... pancit luglug perhaps, if that's the one with the smoked fish. Or palabok.

That looks very authentic! My grandmother doesn't add sourness (in the form of toyomansi, which can be easily mocked up, by the way), she prefers to just serve it with calamansi on the side. Her touch is to render chopped-up pork belly at the start and to add annatto (achuete) water for color and taste.

You nailed the big three when I do intro dinners, too. I always add fried rice, though ... not that it's technically Filipino ... maybe it is. Hmm ... Anyway, I've always favored the vermicelli pancit, usually only going for the egg noodles when the dish was still fresh. It's just not the same after being reheated. It's been a long time since I've made pancit. Gotta get the noodles rolling!

I totally cheat the cabbage and carrot, too--I'm not a slaw fan aside from being able to use the ready-to-use packs in Filipino cooking.

The big 3 is right. Prior to your blog, those were the only Filipino foods I ever ate. Oh wait, and biko (sp?) b/c my friend makes that and it's like VNese che to me.

hey, this post give me envies to eat pansit!! :-) i could eat them for breakfast, lunch and even for miryenda ..btw, i love your pansit it looks really light!!for my version always look a bit soggy :-(

You forgot the one of the most important factors in a pancit ensemble - the stock. The noodles are "softened" in the pan with the rich stock (like chicken or pork); they absorb it. The science is like how you make risotto. That is why there is skill in making this two-noodled: the two types cook differently. If you watch it you can pull it off though. Or you can cook em separately. Or you can place the noodles in hot stock to begin with.

This dish is what is called "bam-i" why its called that I have no idea LOL I will admit I have never attempted to make pancit because well our family has our own "pancit king", my uncle haha and I mean that literally because all he does is cook. all the prepping is done by everyone else but him. He comes in just to cook it and serve it hot off the wok. Its usually gone in seconds. I think he puts patis instead of soy sauce. Maybe I should observe more when he is cooking. Your pancit looks yummy. I dont like them too brown or too many soy sauce. It looks just about right. Good job Marvin =)

I love all types of pancit, especially miki-bihon or bam-i. Thanks for sharing this post.

Your pancit looks yummier than mine! No fair!

The bam-i looks perfect and yummy.
I also prefer my pancit light colored, not too brown, to show the different colors of the vegetables.

just a bit of more pancit dishes i came across some provinces---aside from the bami, there is in the province of Lucena they call pansit habhab. They serve it on a banana leaf and don't give you any fork because you have to eat it by using your hands! Quite an adventure for the inexperienced :-)! It looks like the dish that you just now cooked. Of course there are included the pansit luglug, palabok and lomi which are rich with chicken, pork and shrimp stocks and toppings. I love them all...and I feel the urge to cook some up now!

I'm gonna try this. Thanks for your kitchen experiments in making some of us better cooks.

I also use stock and patis and some soy sauce. Yours looks pretty good. You're an inspiration for other young filipinos..thanks for sharing!

I remember Mike Tyson's Punch-Out! I used to always get to Mr. Sandman and then lose. Oh, the horror!
One time I was in New York and saw a dude riding a bike alongside a guy in a hoodie running by the Hudson and I shouted "Little Mac!"
It was so sweet.

Thanks Mila. I actually have something planned soon for another pancit. Hopefully it turns out ok.

Manggy, my grandmother does something similar too, also adding garlic to the rendered pork belly.

Hi Julie. Yeah, I usually don't use the pre-cut stuff, but it does save a lot of time.

WC, the only VNese I've eaten is Pho and banh mi. Is there a third for the VNese big 3?

dhanggit, this pancit wasn't soggy at all. There was just the right amount of soy in it.

Hi Chad, you're right, stock is another option when cooking the noodles, and it would create even more flavor.

Hi raissa. You're lucky you have your very own pancit king!

Thanks for visiting IvyG! Miki-bihon is another favorite of mine too.

Pat, this IS your pancit! Thanks again for a great recipe.

Thanks oggi! Good point about showing off the colors of the veggies.

Hello bernadette! I'm glad this has inspired you to cook some pancit of your own.

Thanks Cynthia! Let me know how it turns out.

Very nice of you to say cookienurse. Thanks for stopping by!

Carl, I also had trouble with Mr. Sandman. His timing is off, so that was always hard to read. But I'm glad to say that I still have the code to Mike Tyson burned into my brain and I can still beat him today!

Marvin,

Probably goi cuon (summer/salad/spring rolls), the fresh rice paper kind and not the fried ones. Although cha gio (egg rolls) are popular too.

Unless you want to consider drinks, there's always ca phe sua da (VNese iced coffee).

And soon you can add broken rice dishes to your VNese food knowledge. :)

I love to cook Lomi plus bihon. The taste is so good. Canton and bihon is also a bestseller.

Pancit is what my older daughter just requested for her 16th birthday.
Her dad is Pinoy and I am not, so I let him take charge of the cooking using a recipe of my sister-in-law's which is close to this one.
He's a great cook, but not a fast one, so over time I have sped the dish up by using packaged coleslaw mix in place of the cabbage and carrots--it works fine. Our recipe also includes green beans, and I've found that thawed frozen french cut green beans work perfectly. We usually use pork and I add steamed shrimp at the end for the members of the family who like them. But we've also made this with chicken when making it for groups. Everyone always loves it.

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